howlvenice

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    theatlantic:

My Parents, the Real Mad Men

My father saw one episode of Mad Men and refused to watch any more. “You don’t make great ads by drinking and screwing all day!” was his angry objection to a show that he felt insulted the work he’d given his best years to.
As creative director at the Detroit ad agency Campbell-Ewald during precisely the same years that Mad Men portrays, my father, Thomas Murray, had poured his heart into making better advertising for what was the biggest client in the world, General Motors. 
And now some TV creeps were going to use all that as a stylish backdrop for a drama about decadence?
Over his dead body.
Since Dad died in 2009, I’ve been researching the contribution he and the other 1960s ad men made in the hopes of helping Mad Men fans learn what they missed by seeing that world through the filter of Don Draper’s preposterous drinking and casual sex. In a memoir I’m working on, I hope to commemorate the earnest, occasionally fierce, and almost moral devotion of 1960s advertising people to making more communicative, more candid, more human advertising for conservative corporate clients. 
Yes, but what about all the interoffice grab-ass? Was it really like that?
I’d say no, except I’m the product of it—but of a version that also contrasts significantly with the portrayal in Mad Men, and connects more coherently with how we live and work today.
Read more. [Image courtesy of David Murray]

    theatlantic:

    My Parents, the Real Mad Men

    My father saw one episode of Mad Men and refused to watch any more. “You don’t make great ads by drinking and screwing all day!” was his angry objection to a show that he felt insulted the work he’d given his best years to.

    As creative director at the Detroit ad agency Campbell-Ewald during precisely the same years that Mad Men portrays, my father, Thomas Murray, had poured his heart into making better advertising for what was the biggest client in the world, General Motors. 

    And now some TV creeps were going to use all that as a stylish backdrop for a drama about decadence?

    Over his dead body.

    Since Dad died in 2009, I’ve been researching the contribution he and the other 1960s ad men made in the hopes of helping Mad Men fans learn what they missed by seeing that world through the filter of Don Draper’s preposterous drinking and casual sex. In a memoir I’m working on, I hope to commemorate the earnest, occasionally fierce, and almost moral devotion of 1960s advertising people to making more communicative, more candid, more human advertising for conservative corporate clients. 

    Yes, but what about all the interoffice grab-ass? Was it really like that?

    I’d say no, except I’m the product of it—but of a version that also contrasts significantly with the portrayal in Mad Men, and connects more coherently with how we live and work today.

    Read more. [Image courtesy of David Murray]

    — 2 days ago with 161 notes
    Rubber chickies anyone? #VeniceBeach #AbbottKinney

    Rubber chickies anyone? #VeniceBeach #AbbottKinney

    — 5 days ago
    #abbottkinney  #venicebeach 

    Fucking brilliant. Fuck the Poor?

    — 6 days ago
    #message  #advertising  #economy 
    Balls of light in garden at night.#light #twilight

    Balls of light in garden at night.#light #twilight

    — 1 week ago
    #light  #twilight 
    Lovely dinner with Anu and Shona. But won’t be going back to Bucato any time soon.

    Lovely dinner with Anu and Shona. But won’t be going back to Bucato any time soon.

    — 1 week ago
    Christmas long ago #throwbackthursday

    Christmas long ago #throwbackthursday

    — 3 weeks ago
    #throwbackthursday